The MNLUM Law Review Blog is the flagship online publication of the Maharashtra Law University Mumbai. It is a student run peer reviewed legal blog that aims to create a platform that showcases exemplary academic research on contemporary legal and allied issues. This shall be a platform for students, legal practitioners and academicians to express their views and contribute to scholarly discussions on the pertinent concerns that our legal systems grapple with.

The MNLU Law Review Blog is managed and edited by a dedicated team of ten editors operating in a three-tier editorial structure consisting of an Editor-in-Chief, Managing Editors and Associate Editors.


“I congratulate the MNLU Mumbai Law Review team for coming up with this blog. As the past one year has shown, the reach of technology in ensuring access to knowledge remains unparalleled. A platform such as this one would undoubtedly contribute to that end by offering space to some of the finest scholarly work in the field of legal studies. My best wishes for this endeavour.”

-Prof. (Dr.) Dilip Ukey, the Vice Chancellor, MNLU Mumbai


LATEST FROM BLOG POSTS

Liability of Internet Intermediaries in Tortious Defamation

by Vidhi Damani, student at National Law University Jodhpur Introduction The biggest mediums for circulation of defamatory content are social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook, and communication applications such as WhatsApp. This is attributable to the fact that uploading or publishing defamatory content has never been easier than under the encrypted garb of … Continue reading Liability of Internet Intermediaries in Tortious Defamation

A Critique of the Cinematograph (Amendment) Bill, 2021

by Gurkaranbir Singh, student at Symbiosis Law School, Noida. The central government has recently come up with a proposal amending the Cinematograph Act, 1952 to regulate the artistic and creative expressions of filmmakers. It has been done by amending the Cinematograph Act, 1952 through Cinematograph (Amendment) Bill, 2021. At the outset, the bill purports to … Continue reading A Critique of the Cinematograph (Amendment) Bill, 2021

A Promise not to be Broken: Rule of Legitimate Expectation and Promissory Estoppel

by Vishal Singh, student at Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law, Patiala Introduction The Delhi High Court has recently passed a notable judgement, where it held that the promises made by a state authority like Chief Minister in a press conference are legally binding on the Government. The two concepts in this regard are Legitimate … Continue reading A Promise not to be Broken: Rule of Legitimate Expectation and Promissory Estoppel

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